HMB

HMB is responsible for some of the beneficial effects of protein and leucine in the diet. It may be especially important for reducing the breakdown of muscle proteins. HMB is most effective for those who are getting started with exercise or increasing the intensity of their workouts.

Nutraceutic

  • Origin Plant Based, Animal Product, Synthetic
  • Source Leucine
  • Type Amino Acid Metabolite

Muscle Health

The muscles are responsible for body movement, stabilization, regulation of organs, substance transportation and production of heat in addition to being strongly associated with the circulatory and nervous systems. Muscle quality is essential for well being. Supplements that help keep muscles healthy are related to different factors, such as glucose and insulin regulation, protein synthesis, energy metabolism, and others.
  • Muscle Recovery

    When you exercise, you generate stress on your muscles and that damages the muscle fibers, causing them to break apart. During recovery the muscles need fuel to heal stronger than they were before, which will make them stronger.
  • Age Range Teenagers (13-19), Adults (20-59), Seniors (>60)
  • Toxicity There is no evidence of toxicity until now
  • Side effects
  • Warnings

Why be Careful

References

  1. a b Vitamin D status affects strength gains in older adults supplemented with a combination of β-hydroxy-β-methylbutyrate, arginine, and lysine: a cohort study.
  2. a b c Year-long changes in protein metabolism in elderly men and women supplemented with a nutrition cocktail of beta-hydroxy-beta-methylbutyrate (HMB), L-arginine, and L-lysine.
  3. a b c Effect of beta-hydroxy-beta-methylbutyrate, arginine, and lysine supplementation on strength, functionality, body composition, and protein metabolism in elderly women.
  4. ^ Effects of amino acids supplement on physiological adaptations to resistance training.
  5. a b c Sabourin PJ, Bieber LL. Formation of beta-hydroxyisovalerate by an alpha-ketoisocaproate oxygenase in human liverMetabolism. (1983)
  6. a b c d Van Koevering M, Nissen S. Oxidation of leucine and alpha-ketoisocaproate to beta-hydroxy-beta-methylbutyrate in vivoAm J Physiol. (1992)
  7. a b c Nissen S, et al. Effect of leucine metabolite beta-hydroxy-beta-methylbutyrate on muscle metabolism during resistance-exercise trainingJ Appl Physiol. (1996)
  8. ^ Calcium β-Hydroxy-β-Methylbutyrate.
  9. ^ Vukovich MD, et al. beta-hydroxy-beta-methylbutyrate (HMB) kinetics and the influence of glucose ingestion in humansJ Nutr Biochem. (2001)
  10. a b c d Fuller JC Jr, et al. Free acid gel form of β-hydroxy-β-methylbutyrate (HMB) improves HMB clearance from plasma in human subjects compared with the calcium HMB saltBr J Nutr. (2011)
  11. ^ Gallagher PM, et al. Beta-hydroxy-beta-methylbutyrate ingestion, Part I: effects on strength and fat free massMed Sci Sports Exerc. (2000)
  12. ^ Wilson JM, et al. Beta-hydroxy-beta-methyl-butyrate blunts negative age-related changes in body composition, functionality and myofiber dimensions in ratsJ Int Soc Sports Nutr. (2012)
  13. ^ Kim JS, et al. β-hydroxy-β-methylbutyrate did not enhance high intensity resistance training-induced improvements in myofiber dimensions and myogenic capacity in aged female ratsMol Cells. (2012)
  14. a b Vukovich MD, Stubbs NB, Bohlken RM. Body composition in 70-year-old adults responds to dietary beta-hydroxy-beta-methylbutyrate similarly to that of young adultsJ Nutr. (2001)
  15. a b c d e f g h i Kornasio R, et al. Beta-hydroxy-beta-methylbutyrate (HMB) stimulates myogenic cell proliferation, differentiation and survival via the MAPK/ERK and PI3K/Akt pathwaysBiochim Biophys Acta. (2009)
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  17. ^ Siwicki AK, et al. In vitro effects of beta-hydroxy-beta-methylbutyrate (HMB) on cell-mediated immunity in fishVet Immunol Immunopathol. (2000)
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  21. a b c d Eley HL, Russell ST, Tisdale MJ. Attenuation of depression of muscle protein synthesis induced by lipopolysaccharide, tumor necrosis factor, and angiotensin II by beta-hydroxy-beta-methylbutyrateAm J Physiol Endocrinol Metab. (2008)
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  32. a b c Wilson JM, et al. β-Hydroxy-β-methylbutyrate free acid reduces markers of exercise-induced muscle damage and improves recovery in resistance-trained menBr J Nutr. (2013)
  33. a b EFFECT OF β-HYDROXY-β-METHYLBUTYRATE SUPPLEMENTATION DURING ENERGY RESTRICTION IN FEMALE JUDO ATHLETES.
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  35. a b Hoffman JR, et al. Effects of beta-hydroxy beta-methylbutyrate on power performance and indices of muscle damage and stress during high-intensity trainingJ Strength Cond Res. (2004)
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  38. ^ van Someren KA, Edwards AJ, Howatson G. Supplementation with beta-hydroxy-beta-methylbutyrate (HMB) and alpha-ketoisocaproic acid (KIC) reduces signs and symptoms of exercise-induced muscle damage in manInt J Sport Nutr Exerc Metab. (2005)
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  55. a b Russell ST, Tisdale MJ. Mechanism of attenuation by beta-hydroxy-beta-methylbutyrate of muscle protein degradation induced by lipopolysaccharideMol Cell Biochem. (2009)
  56. a b Eley HL, Russell ST, Tisdale MJ. Mechanism of attenuation of muscle protein degradation induced by tumor necrosis factor-alpha and angiotensin II by beta-hydroxy-beta-methylbutyrateAm J Physiol Endocrinol Metab. (2008)
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  60. ^ May PE, et al. Reversal of cancer-related wasting using oral supplementation with a combination of beta-hydroxy-beta-methylbutyrate, arginine, and glutamineAm J Surg. (2002)
  61. ^ Smith HJ, Mukerji P, Tisdale MJ. Attenuation of proteasome-induced proteolysis in skeletal muscle by {beta}-hydroxy-{beta}-methylbutyrate in cancer-induced muscle lossCancer Res. (2005)
  62. ^ Clark RH, et al. Nutritional treatment for acquired immunodeficiency virus-associated wasting using beta-hydroxy beta-methylbutyrate, glutamine, and arginine: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled studyJPEN J Parenter Enteral Nutr. (2000)
  63. a b EFFECT OF β-HYDROXY-β-METHYLBUTYRATE SUPPLEMENTATION DURING ENERGY RESTRICTION IN FEMALE JUDO ATHLETES.
  64. ^ Jówko E, et al. Creatine and beta-hydroxy-beta-methylbutyrate (HMB) additively increase lean body mass and muscle strength during a weight-training programNutrition. (2001)
  65. ^ O’Connor DM, Crowe MJ. Effects of six weeks of beta-hydroxy-beta-methylbutyrate (HMB) and HMB/creatine supplementation on strength, power, and anthropometry of highly trained athletesJ Strength Cond Res. (2007)
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  67. ^ Baxter JH, et al. Dietary toxicity of calcium beta-hydroxy-beta-methyl butyrate (CaHMB)Food Chem Toxicol. (2005)
  68. ^ Guidance for Industry: Estimating the Maximum Safe Starting Dose in Initial Clinical Trials for Therapeutics in Adult Healthy Volunteers.
  69. ^ International Society of Sports Nutrition Position Stand: beta-hydroxy-beta-methylbutyrate (HMB).
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  71. ^ Nissen S, et al. beta-hydroxy-beta-methylbutyrate (HMB) supplementation in humans is safe and may decrease cardiovascular risk factorsJ Nutr. (2000)
  72. ^ Rathmacher JA, et al. Supplementation with a combination of beta-hydroxy-beta-methylbutyrate (HMB), arginine, and glutamine is safe and could improve hematological parametersJPEN J Parenter Enteral Nutr. (2004)